Library Technology Launchpad Relaunched

Library Technology Launchpad Version 2

‚ÄčToday I relaunched my Library Technology Launchpad website. I moved it from WordPress.com to my own host and gave the site a redesign. The previous version ran from 2011 to 2013 with social media updates continuing through 2014.

View the website at libtechlaunchpad.com.

At Library Technology Launchpad I’ll cover technology relevant to librarians and libraries. Covered topics will include:

  • Links to library technology news
  • eBook purchasing and subscription trends
  • Mobile library websites and eReader apps
  • Online information resources
  • Social media and libraries
  • Library user experience (UX)
  • Cloud computing for libraries
  • Institutional repositories ans scholarly communication
  • Research data management
  • Search engine tips and tricks
  • Useful general technology information

Library Technology Launchpad is also on social media.

The Library as Publishing House Chapter Published

Last year I submitted a proposal for a chapter to a book on the 21st-century academic library. My subject was institutional repositories and how libraries were now functioning as publishing houses by providing a platform for digital journal publishing.

“The academic library takes on the new role as institutional publishing house using institutional repository services to manage journal publishing and conference planning. Librarians must know the journal publishing workflow including online article submission, peer-review, editing, publishing, dissemination, and marketing. To manage conference planning functions, librarians need to understand event functions such as presentation submission, program scheduling, registration and third-party payment systems, proceedings publishing, and marketing.

Librarians at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University launched an institutional repository not only to showcase intellectual output, but to digitally publish new and existing journals and centrally manage professional conferences for university faculty and students.”

I asked Anne Marie Casey and Chip Wolfe to colCreating Research Infrastructures in the 21st-Century Academic Library: Conceiving, Funding, and Building New Facilities and Stafflaborate and our chapter was submitted last Fall.

This month the book Creating Research Infrastructures in the 21st-Century Academic Library: Conceiving, Funding, and Building New Facilities and Staff was published and I received my copy this week.

From the description on the back cover:

“Creating Research Infrastructures in the 21st-Century Academic Library: Conceiving, Funding, and Building New Facilities and Staff focuses on research infrastructures, bringing together such topics as research and development in libraries, dataset management, e-science, grants and grant writing, digital scholarship, data management, library as publisher, web archiving, and the research lifecycle. Individual chapters deal with the formation of Research & Development teams; emerging scholarly forms and new collaborative approaches to knowledge creation, dissemination, and preservation; managing small databases requiring the same level of support as large databases: metadata; digital preservation and curation; and technical support. Support for such services is provided in a chapter that considers how assessment and data now drive decisions and new services in higher education and more specifically in academic libraries and how statistical data can help to tell stories, make decisions, and move in new directions. Conceptualization of the research process is also examined through the presentation of a research lifecycle in the university environment with the library as an integral partner and leader. The library as publisher, an increasingly important topic, with new institutional repositories tied to journal creation, curation, and management is examined with a discussion of the workflow and expertise necessary for the library to be successful and responsive to the research needs of its institution and become a leader in providing publishing services to its faculty.

This volume, and the series in general, is a valuable and exciting addition to the discussions and planning surrounding the future directions, services, and careers of the 21st-century academic librarian.”

The book is available from Amazon.com and Barnes & Noble.

Customizing LibAnswers to Create a Recommended Websites Service

When we learned that the university’s ColdFusion server was getting old and the IT department wanted to decommission it, I began “Project Abandon ColdFusion” to migrate all of our home-grown ColdFusion applications to other services. The last of these services was our “Recommended Websites” service.

I searched many options. The service needed to be free, easy to use and maintain, and preferably something the library was already using. This led me to LibAnswers and its FAQ groups. With a bit of customization, it could be made to function as a Recommended Websites service. So with some advice and help from Kelly Robinson, the site structure and layout was built. Research librarians on the Recommended Websites Committee entered in website names and descriptions and assigned topics and keywords.

The new Recommended Websites service launched on August 20, 2015 at http://hunt-answers.erau.edu/rw.

The new service received some recognition from Springshare, the creator of LibAnswers, on their Twitter page.

Springshare Twitter post on Recommended Websites